Costi Hinn (Photo: YouTube/SO4J-TV)

God

Dec 17, 2018 by Alyssa Duvall

Benny Hinn's Nephew: "5 Reasons I Hate The Prosperity Gospel"

After giving up the lavish lifestyle that comes with being in the inner circle of one of the prosperity or word-faith movement's biggest names, Costi Hinn, nephew of Benny Hinn, has made it his mission to combat the grievous errors he once embraced. In an unequivocal treatise on the "prosperity gospel" for ChurchLeaders.com, Costi gives the five biggest reasons, plus an important preface, why he hates the "name it, claim it" message.

"Hate is a strong word. Using it should always be done in prudent fashion," Hinn begins. "People today hate a lot of things, but we must ensure we’re hating the right things."

"Let the reader understand, I don’t necessarily hate the people preaching it or family members who propagate it, nor do I believe that malicious or violent behavior toward a prosperity preacher is becoming of Christians," he clarifies. "...There is an anger that God considers to be righteous (Ephesians 4:26) and we have a duty as Christians to push away apathy and embrace action when it comes to anything that tears down our God and His truth...but it should always be accompanied by humble prayer and biblical explanation lest we become the dragon we’re trying to slay."

  1. "It's not good news."
    “'Gospel' literally means good news, and the prosperity gospel is not that at all," Hinn states. "While prosperity preachers sell what appears to be good fortune, it’s actually damning heresy that paves the road to hell. Too strong? Not when you compare the true gospel to the lunacy that prosperity preachers promise. I love seeing lost people saved by the Gospel so much that I hate anything that gets in the way of them hearing transformational truth"
  2. "It blasphemes Scripture."
    "One of the most hateful and abusive things happening in the church-world today is when a person opens the Bible and uses it as a tool for deception. This is blasphemy," Hinn declares. "The Bible declares some incredible things about itself. 2 Timothy 3:16 specifically reminds us that Scripture is 'God breathed.' How dare someone take what comes directly from the Holy One and use it for sordid gain?"

  3. "It insults Christ."
    "He’s worthy of honor, glory and praise. One day, every knee will bow before Him and declare Him King (Romans 14:11). But for now, there are those who smear His heavenly name to build their earthly empire," Hinn laments.

    "They ascribe promises to men that Jesus never made. Jesus did not come to inaugurate a get-rich-quick scheme for humanity, He came to fulfill a redemptive plan," Hinn adds. "What an insult to make Jesus into a lottery ticket! Jesus didn’t die on the cross to provide a steady stream of Bentley’s, Big Diamonds and Botox. He died on the cross to provide our atonement."

  4. "It exploits the poor."
    Hinn, speaking from experience, notes that what we see when big names in the movement visit poor communities in a "perfectly edited program on TBN" doesn't give us the full picture. Instead, a "prosperity preacher" will fly to such a country on a private jet, stay in a nice hotel far away from the slums, and proceed to pack a soccer stadium "with 300,000 desperate people in order to exploit them for money and good TV marketing." 

    "I’ve been there and done that," Hinn says. "It’s fun on the inside but scary once you think about eternal ramifications. God loves the poor. Exploit them and you’re going to be dealing with Him one day."

  5. "It has become mainstream."
    Perhaps the most startling problem of all with the prosperity movement, Hinn declares, is that it has advanced beyond the fringe of Christianity into popularity and acceptability. 

    "...I hate the prosperity gospel because it has produced a massive wave of destruction across the globe. Worst of all, that wave of destruction has become mainstream. People want it (2 Timothy 4:3-4). From America, to Africa, to South America and beyond, the prosperity gospel is en vogue."


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